Monday, September 08, 2008

Discussion Leaders' documents, group "b", chaper 3 (pre-1547)

His 3100, Fall 2008, Discussion Group Assignments: Post a ranked list of 3 documents from ch. 3, Sources and Debates with 1-2 sentences on each explaining what the class should get out of those documents by September 15 (by noon)

I will then draw up a list of 5 documents which the whole class should read and the group will then be responsible for presenting the documents Sept. 18 to the class, ask questions, present context (using: other documents in the chapter and its introduction, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford English Dictionary, and textbook), and, if necessary, begin the discussion between themselves.

9 comments:

balkanization said...

3.2 Confession of John Pykas (1527) because Pykas is a minor character who is clearly not only reading the Bible but a number of pamphlets that are satirical/critical of the established (Catholic) Church well before the official Reformation.

3.3 Opening of the Reformation Parliament (1529) because the tenor of this period is a clear attack on the Church, but mainly for fiscal/tax/money policies not because there is any debate on the fundamental tenets of the Church (at least not in what they said here).

3.x (from the handout) Cardinal Campeggio to Cardinal Salviatti (1528) because the Cardinals are seeking a way to deal with Henry VIII's "Great Matter" as delicately as possible, and they and the King are pleased with the idea of persuading Katherin "to enter some religious house." That was never going to happen, but it does suggest that all concerned just wanted a way out and not necessarily a revolutionary Reformation.

Newton K

Trisha Spuck said...

3.11 Act abolishing diversity of opinions because there is still a uniform belief inside the church and religion. It is now showing that the church is going to retake some of the power among ordinary people.

3.5 Pontefract Articles because it helps to understand that the church still plays a role in the new reformed England and that it plays a role in government still as well, even though this was becoming an increasingly unpopular idea. I understood it as trying to restore the power back into the church as a whole.

3.1 The State of Melford Church just to learn what the significance of the church was in towns and villages. To understand the different challenges of the new and reformed church in England in comparison to the older church

Anonymous said...

a

amey sneed said...

3.2 Confession of John Pykas(1527.)
He experiences that we as humans can not live our entire lives perfectly and without flaw for we have already been destined. This document is important because it deals with the church as a whole before it was questioned on the grounds of accuracy.

3.4 (from the handout) Henry VIII questions his posistion and the role the church plays in the actions of citizens. A clear example of confusion (power and belief) between the church, culture, economy, and society.


3.10 Pontefract Articles ( from the handout) This article shows how much power authorities (king)still has over the church and the community. Attacks against the Dissolution leads to revolt.

papabearjoyner said...

3.8 (new) Answer of the Ordinaries.
This highlights the first “salvo” in the Protestant assault on the Catholic Church in England. The charging of the bishops and their subsequent retort shows the initial refusal and dismissal of submission to the king’s power by said clergy.
3.9 (new) Submission of the Clergy.
This shows the new change in attitude of the English Clergy as they realized that their lives were at stake and that the Henry VIII was not merely flexing his power, but seriously intent on changing the status quo.
3.8 (book) Deaths of Bishops Latimer and Ridley.
The death of the famous “Oxford Martyrs” marks a major point in the struggle between Protestantism and Catholicism in England. These two Protestants demonstrate the depth of belief and conviction held by the new religious order. The brutal manner of their death dispels any disbelief as to their piety or motives in changing the status quo of the English church. In essence, what may have began as a political expedient for Henry VIII had turned into a very real spiritual awakening in many. The famous quote by Latimer, “Be of good comfort, Master Ridley, and play the man; we shall this day light such a candle, by God's grace, in England, as I trust shall never be put out”, demonstrates the sincerity of these men.

michelle said...

3.9 (new) Submission of the Clergy. The Clergy has finally come under the rule of the king and will do whatever he says in order not to get into trouble.

3.5 (book) Pontefract Articles. These articles are a list of what the church, parliament, and the king can and cannot do.

3.2 Confession of John Pykas of Colchester. In this document, John talks about what religious life should be like. One example is that when you give confession, it should be to God, not to a priest.

Anonymous said...

3.6 Cranmer’s Answer to the Fifteen Articles of the Devon Rebels (1549) because he puts the men of Devonshire and Cornwall in their place. Cranmer refutes the articles, and expresses the appeal of the Church of England to the common people. This document is important because it shows the struggle between Catholic and Protestant religious traditions.

3.4 Henry VIII to Anne Boleyn (1528) because this document displays Henry VIII’s desire to find scriptural evidence that would support an annulment. Also this document portrays the beginning of Henry’s doubt in the Church as a whole. This love letter is important because it not only displays the king’s need to find a legimate way out of his marriage that did not produce a male heir. Also, King Henry VIII showed in this letter his true desire to be with the woman he loved.

3.7 Robert Parkyn’s Narrative of the Reformation (1555) because it gives details about implementation of the English services and Protestant rituals; which created religious confusion. It highlights the religious instability in England from 1549 (the English Reformation started before 1549) to the beginning of Mary. However, one can detect Parkyn’s bias opinion toward Catholicism.

Julie C

hannah michalsen said...

hannah said...
3.1 The State of Melford Church describes important holidays in the church to help learn what the significances are to the towns. It also helps understand the differences between the new and old church.

3.5 The Pontefract Articles are a list of what the king, parliment, and clergy can and cannot do.

3.11 Act of Abolishing Diversity of Opinions describes what the king wanted in the new reformed church because he wanted to maintain tradition in theology and ritual.

hannah michalsen said...

hannah said...
3.1 The State of Melford Church describes important holidays in the church to help learn what the significances are to the towns. It also helps understand the differences between the new and old church.

3.5 The Pontefract Articles are a list of what the king, parliment, and clergy can and cannot do.

3.11 Act of Abolishing Diversity of Opinions describes what the king wanted in the new reformed church because he wanted to maintain tradition in theology and ritual.

 

Creative Commons License
This work by Newton Key
is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License.